Drink

Homebrew: Hefeweizen Bottling Day

It’s time to bottle the hefeweizen we brewed a couple of weeks ago! We prefer to bottle our beer rather than keg. Mainly because we like to share our brews with family and friends. Normally, we get 53 or 54 12-ounce bottles out of a 5 gallon batch of beer.

The morning of the day we bottled, we placed the carboy on the counter top with a cardboard box over it. This way, the sediment that was disturbed while moving the carboy settled back down before we bottled. The cardboard box was just to keep the beer in the dark because our kitchen gets a lot of sunlight.

Sanitized bottles.
Sanitized bottles.
Bottling equipment.
Bottling equipment.
Hefeweizen ready to be bottled.
Ready to be bottled!

Before bottling, we sanitized all bottling equipment.

After everything was sanitized, we prepared the priming sugar (corn sugar). Priming sugar is added to carbonate the beer. This was prepared by bringing 2 cups of water to a boil and adding the corn sugar. After adding the sugar, we let it boil for another couple of minutes until the sugar was dissolved. Then we removed the priming sugar from the heat and cooled it down to less than 80°F.

Adding corn sugar (priming sugar) to the boiling water.
Adding corn sugar (priming sugar) to the boiling water.
Cooling the priming sugar.
Cooling the priming sugar to less than 80°F.
Adding priming sugar to bottling bucket.
Adding priming sugar to bottling bucket.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bottling bucket filling with homebrew.
Bottling bucket filling with homebrew.
Transferring homebrew to bottling bucket.
Transferring homebrew to bottling bucket.

When the priming sugar was ready, we added it to the bottling bucket first and then transferred the hefeweizen from the carboy. We added the priming sugar first for better mixing with the hefeweizen. When transferring the beer, we tried not to disturb any of the sediment on the bottom of the carboy.

When the transfer was finished, we moved the bottling bucket to the counter and hooked up some tubing – one end to the spigot and the other end to a bottle filler. Once everything was attached, we began filling the bottles. We have a system where one of us fills the bottle and passes it to the other, who then caps the bottle. After the bottles were all capped, we placed the beer in a dark closet for storage while carbonation takes place.

Finished bottling!
Finished bottling!
Ready to cap the homebrew.
Ready to cap the homebrew.
Filling a bottle with homebrew.
Filling a bottle with homebrew.

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